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acronym list 3

Continueing my explanation of acconyms that will be in the tech and the comptia exam. These are summariies but I will add links so you can get more indetailed information.

CGA Computer Graphics and Applications

I could not find a clear defeniton of  CGA I found other definiotions. If any can let me know  We found othter definitions

CG Computer Graphics

Computer graphics is a sub-field of Computer Science which studies methods for digitally synthesizing and manipulating visual content. Although the term often refers to the study of three-dimensional computer graphics, it also encompasses two-dimensional graphics and image processing.

CGA Color Graphic Adaptor

Abbreviation of color/graphics adapter, an old graphics system for PCs. Introduced in 1981 by IBM, CGA was the first color graphics system for IBM PCs. Designed primarily for computer games, CGA does not produce sharp enough characters for extended editing sessions. CGA’s highest-resolution mode is 2 colors at a resolution of 640 by 200. CGA has been superseded by VGA systems.

CG&A Bridge Computer Graphics and Application

CG&A  bridges the theory and practice of computer graphics and applications and is big topic in IEEE.

CIDR Classless Inter-Domain Routing

Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR /ˈsaɪdər, ˈsɪ-/) is a method for allocating IP addresses and IP routing. The Internet Engineering Task Force introduced CIDR in 1993 to replace the previous addressing architecture of classful network design in the Internet. Its goal was to slow the growth of routing tables on routers across the Internet, and to help slow the rapid exhaustion of IPv4 addresses

CIFS Common Internet File System

In computer networking, Server Message Block (SMB), one version of which was also known as Common Internet File System (CIFS /sɪfs/),[1][2] is a network communication protocol[3] for providing shared access to files, printers, and serial ports between nodes on a network. It also provides an authenticated inter-process communication mechanism. Most usage of SMB involves computers running Microsoft Windows, where it was known as “Microsoft Windows Network” before the introduction of Active Directory. Corresponding Windows services are LAN Manager Server for the server component, and LAN Manager Workstation for the client component.[4]

CMOS Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor

Complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS), also known as complementary-symmetry metal–oxide–semiconductor (COS-MOS), is a type of MOSFET (metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor) fabrication process that uses complementary and symmetrical pairs of p-type and n-type MOSFETs for logic functions.[1] CMOS technology is used for constructing integrated circuits (ICs), including microprocessors, microcontrollers, memory chips (including CMOS BIOS), and other digital logic circuits. CMOS technology is also used for analog circuits such as image sensors (CMOS sensors), data converters, RF circuits (RF CMOS), and highly integrated transceivers for many types of communication.

CNR Communications and Networking Riser

Communications and networking riser (CNR) is a slot found on certain PC motherboards and used for specialized networking, audio, and telephony equipment. A motherboard manufacturer can choose to provide audio, networking, or modem functionality in any combination on a CNR card. CNR slots were once commonly found on Pentium 4-class motherboards, but have since been phased out in favor of on-board or embedded components.

COMx Communication port (x=port number)

COM (Communication port[1]) is the original, yet still common, name of the serial port interface on IBM PC-compatible computers. It can refer not only to physical ports, but also to emulated ports, such as ports created by Bluetooth or USB-to-serial adapters.

CPU Central Processing Unit

A central processing unit (CPU), also called a central processor or main processor, is the electronic circuitry within a computer that carries out the instructions of a computer program by performing the basic arithmetic, logic, controlling, and input/output (I/O) operations specified by the instructions. The computer industry has used the term “central processing unit” at least since the early 1960s.[1] Traditionally, the term “CPU” refers to a processor, more specifically to its processing unit and control unit (CU), distinguishing these core elements of a computer from external components such as main memory and I/O circuitry.[2]

CRT Cathode-Ray Tube

The cathode-ray tube (CRT) is a vacuum tube that contains one or more electron guns and a phosphorescent screen and is used to display images.[1] It modulates, accelerates, and deflects electron beam(s) onto the screen to create the images. The images may represent electrical waveforms (oscilloscope), pictures (television, computer monitor), radar targets, or other phenomena. CRTs have also been used as memory devices, in which case the visible light emitted from the fluorescent material (if any) is not intended to have significant meaning to a visual observer (though the visible pattern on the tube face may cryptically represent the stored data).

DaaS Data as a Service

In computing, data as a service (or DaaS) is a cousin of software as a service (SaaS).[1] Like all members of the “as a service” (aaS) family, DaaS builds on the concept that the product (data in this case) can be provided on demand[2] to the user regardless of geographic or organizational separation of provider and consumer. Additionally, the emergence[when?] of service-oriented architecture (SOA) and the widespread use of application programming interface (API) has also rendered the actual platform on which the data resides irrelevant.[3] This development has enabled the emergence of the relatively new concept of DaaS.

DAC Discretionary Access Control

In computer security, discretionary access control (DAC) is a type of access control defined by the Trusted Computer System Evaluation Criteria[1] “as a means of restricting access to objects based on the identity of subjects and/or groups to which they belong. The controls are discretionary in the sense that a subject with a certain access permission is capable of passing that permission (perhaps indirectly) on to any other subject (unless restrained by mandatory access control)”.

Matt

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